• 1999

    Babul Music Video.

    In the music video, ‘Babul’ a little girl holds up a mirror to society which often ignores the uncomfortable conversation around domestic violence. Through the eyes of a little girl, the video threw light on the double standards our society thrives on, with the aim to make the issue of domestic violence both mainstream and urgent to address.

  • 2002

    Hamman Hai Ishq.

    An exhibition- concert, a showcase of music of Shubha Mudgal supported by the digital art and paintings of Haku Shah, Hamman Ishq Hai (That love is all there is) was an event hosted at the India Habitat Center to revisit and revive the spirit of communal harmony and religious pluralism and communal harmony which is intrinsic to the fabric of our country.

  • 2003

    Baagon Na Jaa.

    A story of the friendship of Muslim boy and a Hindu schoolteacher, set the music of Shubha Mudgal based on a poem by poet Kabir, Baagon Na Jaa was a music video about Communal Harmony, and bond that transcend religious differences.

  • Tri-Continental Film festival.

    We sought out to tell stories from around the world, to help drive our messages of social justice, human rights and advocacy. Through this festival, we aimed to build awareness, mobilise public engagement and start crucial conversations about the issues we encounter in our everyday environment.

  • 2005

    What kind of man are you?.

    This campaign did the unique task of placing a gender lens on the debate around HIV/AIDS. It urged men to reflect on their choices with regards to safe sex, nudging them to take responsibility for their partners’ sexual health and becoming a part of the solution. It also spoke to women with the aim to help them negotiate condoms as a means to protect themselves.

  • 2007

    Is this Justice?.

    Our multimedia campaign, ‘Yeh Kaisa Insaaf Hai?’ focused on women living with HIV/AIDS and highlighted the irony of them facing discrimination due to an infection they contracted from their male partners. From being shunned from society, rendered jobless, homeless and vulnerable to abuse. With multilingual print, radio and TV ads created pro bono by Ogilvy and Mather’s Piyush Pandey, our campaign threw light on the inequality that plagues women, both in health and in sickness.

  • 2008

    Bell Bajao.

    Domestic violence is considered a ‘personal matter’. Events that transpire behind closed doors carry on without the fear of accountability. Our “Bell Bajao” campaign aimed to inch away from this status quo, pushing boys and men to ‘ring the bell’ and interrupt incidents of abuse. We created a series of award-winning PSAs, which have been viewed by over 130 million people worldwide. In 2010, our video van took the messages to cities and villages engaging communities through street theatre and games.

  • 2011

    Nation Against Early Marriage.

    Our work on domestic violence led us to our work on early marriage, recognising that women who were married at a young age, were the most vulnerable to abuse. Our programme was followed by the 2013 UNHRC’s resolution against child, forced and early marriages to eliminate it as a part of the post-2015 Global Development Agenda.

  • 2012

    Mission Hazaar.

    In urgent response to the fast-falling sex ratio - 919 girls per thousand boys in India, we launched the #MissionHazaar campaign. During our work on domestic violence, we found that many women were forced to go in for sex-selective abortions by family members, given the lack of agency they experienced in their lives. The need to address this issue was echoed by the Government of India which adopted our campaign as a part of the 2015 Beti Bachao Beti Padhao campaign.

  • #AskingForIt and #ShareYourStory.

    As we raged angrily, heartbroken about the Nirbhaya rape case, we took on the debate of victim-blaming, channelling our outrage into transformational conversations. #AskingForIt, a phrase often used for victim shaming in cases of sexual harassment and assault, was overturned to become an urgent resounding call to action for bystander intervention. With our #ShareYourStory campaign, we asked women to share their stories of harassment with their sons as a tool to develop empathy in the young men of our society, urging them to reflect on their behaviour.

  • 2016

    Skoll Award.

    In 2016, Breakthrough were recognised by the Skoll Foundation for our dedicated and consistent work on the issue of early marriage as well as the reinforcement of positive norms. The award was received by Mallika Dutt and Sonali Khan of Breakthrough, who used the platform to highlight how the most vulnerable sections of the society, such as schoolgirls, are also the most overlooked.

  • 2016

    Nari Shakti Puraskar.

    When your work gets the right sort of attention, you know you’re on the right track. In 2016, Breakthrough was the recipient of India’s highest civilian award for recognising the achievements and contributions of women, which it received under the category of ‘The Rani Lakshmi Bai Award for Best Institution for Research & Development in the field of women empowerment’ from the then president of India, Shri Pranab Mukherjee.

  • 2016

    #StandWithMe.

    Harassment isn’t limited to our physical surroundings. With our youth campaign #StandWithMe, we took on the issue of online harassment, sensitising communities about the need for an empathetic safe space online - free of judgment or intimidation. We stressed on dialogue and support for young people facing harassment, both online and offline and organised workshops and meetups to encourage digital literacy and creation of safe spaces online.

  • 2017

    StreeLink Programme.

    Gender-based violence needs to be addressed in the multiple spaces women inhabit. For women in the workforce, this meant addressing their homes, communities, workplace and public spaces. Violence and discrimination against women is a continuum which needs to addressed in all spaces they inhabit. Our StreeLink Programme works with various stakeholders to help alter perceptions and create a safe, secure workplace that upholds gender justice.

  • 2017

    JPAL Evaluation of Taaron ki Toli in Haryana.

    One of Breakthrough’s standout initiatives was the Taaron Ki Toli programme, where a gender sensitisation curriculum was implemented across 152 schools in Haryana, aimed at empowering students and communities to question gender norms. The curriculum was a success, with more girls being able to complete their education. Three years after its implementation, the programme was evaluated by the Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab and indicated a significant shift in both Gender Attitude and Gender Behaviour Index for the students.

  • 2019

    Breakthrough turns 20! .

    From 1999 to 2019, Breakthrough finished two decades. This year, in particular, was marked by impressive results: according to the data from Jharkhand and Bihar Early Marriage programme, the age girls were getting married at increased by 1.77 years, a remarkable achievement! Refer to leena+ alok’s document

  • 1995

    Beijing Declaration.

    With an aim to eradicate gender inequality by the year 2030, 189 countries adopted The Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action (BPFA) at the Fourth World Conference on Women in 1995, in Beijing, China. Breakthrough was selected to be a part of the National Steering Committee by UN-Women and participated in multiple regional consultations held all over the country to review the progress of the principles and actions laid out at the conference. We also provided recommendations to the National Level CSO Review Report put together by UN-Women.

  • 1999

    Mann Ke Manjeere music video.

    Our breakthrough act was the music album and video “Mann Ke Manjeere” which tells the story of a domestic-violence survivor, Shameem Pathan. Through this song, we made the often-uncomfortable conversation about gender-based violence and discrimination both mainstream and urgent. The video won a National Award, was nominated as “MTV’s Best Indipop Music Video” and reached 26 million households via 6 satellite music TV channels across South Asia, Indonesia, Tajikistan and the United States.

About Breakthrough.

The Breakthrough Story

We are an organisation working to create a cultural shift and make discrimination and violence against girls and women unacceptable.

Experiences and stories are our tools of choice, as we endeavour to make the subject of gender-based violence mainstream. We speak to our large and diverse audience in a language they can relate to, using mediums they respond to - such as music, new media and popular culture.

This new approach to problem-solving is what led to the music album “Mann ke Manjeere”. What started as a music video, took on a life of its own and became a movement. We have since focused our efforts on opening doors, breaking barriers, and starting honest conversations about gender, violence and discrimination, with women, men, adolescents, youth, families and communities as units, frontline health workers, government officials, influencers etc.

With partners that have supported us, media platforms that have amplified our call, and messaging that has translated into tangible action on the ground, our endeavour to transform the world around us grows stronger every day. Our approach of one home, one workplace, one community at a time have helped create a positive impact on millions of women and girls.

Our story is a sum total of many truths and realities that propel us to work towards creating a change in our social environments.

About the founder.

Mallika Dutt

With a dream to spark cultural change via innovative storytelling, Mallika Parvati Dutt has dedicated her life and life’s work to co-create a world where we are all equal. Founder of the global rights organisation, Breakthrough, Mallika led the group as president & CEO for 17 years, until 2017.

A human rights activist for several decades, she has worked with universities and organisations that identify the need for a dialogue on gender and violence. Mallika drives her unique vision for cultural impact and change by combining ancient wisdom and spiritual practices with contemporary technology and tools - bringing planet, people and purpose together with a coaching, speaking and strategy practice.

Her work has also been felicitated by multiple awards, including the Skoll Award for Social Entrepreneurship in 2016 and an Honorary Doctorate from her undergraduate college, Mount Holyoke, Massachusetts.

Strength.

Meet the team that steers our organisation.
Sohini . Bhattacharya
Joshy . Jose
Sunita . Menon
Leena . Sushant
Ditipriya . Ghosh
Urvashi . Gandhi
Priyanka . Kher
Yogita . Verma
Nayana . Chowdhury

Our Board.

The guiding force behind our team.
Sashwati . Banerjee
Bishakha . Dutta
Mallika . Dutt
Priya . Paul
Sanjeev . Duggal
Santosh . Desai
Suneeta . Kar Dhar

Our Mentors.

The guiding force behind our team.
Lakshmi . Lingam
Samik . Roy

Our Work.

To ensure every women and girl in the world have their freedom to be.

Get Involved.

Join the generation that is working to make the world equal and violence-free.
© 2019 Breakthrough Trust. All rights reserved.